Advice when someone dies intestate

If somebody dies without leaving a Will or their Will is not valid then this is known as dying intestate. At Royds Withy King we can provide legal advice on intestacy and how this may affect an inheritance.

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Dying intestate usually means that there is a set list of people who the estate will be passed down to, however this is not always straightforward, and in certain circumstances it is even possible to contest the division of assets.

Whether the lack of a Will is causing issues around the division of an estate or not, we are able manage the situation quickly and with sensitivity. We also advise disappointed beneficiaries on their options including applications to the court for a share in an estate.

If you are involved in the estate of someone who has died without a valid Will then contact us today for a no obligation conversation. Let us manage any legal complications and avoid wasting time and money.

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01225 300656

WKTL can act as a professional trustee if required

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Other reasons why someone may wish to set up a trust:

Asset protection reasons

This might be to prevent children getting money too soon, to help with grandchildren’s school fees.

IHT planning purposes

To assist a vulnerable person – whether ‘disabled’ under the tax legislation or for other reasons without jeopardising entitlement to means tested benefits.

Those who want to put life insurance, death-in-service benefits or pension death benefits into trust so as to mitigate an IHT liability on death and to ensure funds pass in a sensible and tax efficient manner

Non-domiciles

Non-domiciled individuals who are keen to establish an excluded property trust before they become UK dom/residents.

Business owners protecting shares

Business owners looking to put in place planning pre-sale by putting shares into trust to lock in business property relief.

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