Search our news, events & opinions

2 October 2014 0 Comments
Posted in Employment, Opinion

E-cigarettes in the workplace – no smoke without fire, or is there?

Posted by , Partner

The use of e-cigarettes has been a hot topic recently, with a polarised debate in the media and elsewhere about their health benefits and acceptability. Increasingly they are impacting on the workplace, so what considerations do employers need to take into account?

E-cigarettes are battery operated devices that mimic smoking by producing vapour and releasing nicotine. As e-cigarettes do not fall within current anti-smoking laws, the use of them in the workplace does not break the law. Many employees feel able to ‘light up’ at work, including in company vehicles without breaching any policy. But should you allow it? There are several issues to consider:

Firstly, the health and safety of employees. There is no conclusive medical opinion on the safety of e-cigarettes, but clearly using one while driving or operating machinery is a health and safety risk. While the vapour may not be carcinogenic, other employees may find their use off-putting or unpleasant, particularly if they are trying to quit themselves.

Employers may also consider that the use of e-cigarettes creates an unprofessional environment at work – for employees and customers or clients.

But on the other hand, allowing the use of e-cigarettes could support employees in their attempts to quit smoking and potentially increase productivity by avoiding the need for employees to take breaks. A ban on e-cigarettes inside the office could mean that e-cigarette users may have to share the designated smoking areas with smokers. Being exposed to tobacco smoke could hinder their efforts to quit smoking and pose health risks.

Practical steps for employers
Whatever the decision, you should:

have a clear policy on e-cigarette use either by incorporating it into your smoking policy or having a separate policy
make sure that the policy is brought to the attention of all employees – consulting with any recognised union or elected representatives in the first instance
if e-cigarette use is banned, you should decide how to deal with smoking/e-cigarette breaks, and
explain in your policies that failure to comply with them can lead to disciplinary action.

For more information and advice on any of the changes discussed in this update, or any other employment law or HR matter, please get in touch with members of our Employment & HR Team.

Our Employment & HR team specialises in working closely with business owners and HR professionals on all aspects of employment law, including policies and procedures, remuneration and benefit issues, avoiding discrimination issues, as well as disciplinary/dismissal procedures and employment tribunals.

01865 268 663     Email usmark.emery@roydswithyking.com

Leave a comment

Thank you for choosing to leave a comment. Please keep in mind that comments are moderated and please do not use a spammy keyword or a domain as your name or it will be deleted.

*required*

**required*

*optional*

Employment

It pays to employ the right employment solicitor

Learn more

Partner

T: 01793 847 722 (DDI)
Email

Search our news, events & opinions