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The new Children’s Funeral Fund: what is it and who does it help?

Author headshot imagePosted by , Senior Associate

New Government funding announced last month means that no local authority will now be able to charge parents for the burial or cremation of children who have passed away.

This announcement follows a 28-year campaign by the MP Carolyn Harris and means that parents who are in the devastating position of losing their child will not have to struggle financially to provide their child with a dignified and respectful funeral.

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Approximately 17,000 people develop CRPS each year: why is it still so poorly understood?

Author headshot imagePosted by , Partner

If you turned your TV to Channel 5 News last week, you might have seen a story about CRPS. To many this will have seemed totally new, but sadly for many people CRPS is something they’ve had to live with for a long time, and without much sympathy or even recognition that the condition is “real”.

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The group championing research for spinally injured patients

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Ian Carrier, who heads up our team of spinal injury specialists and is a member of the Spinal Injuries Association tells us about the valuable work carried out by Stoke Mandeville Spinal Research, and how it benefits spinally injured people.

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Landlords – does the Pre-Action Protocol for Debt Claims apply to your dealings with tenants?

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The Pre-Action Protocol for Debt Claims has been in force since 1 October 2017 and sets out rules to follow when any business is claiming payment of a debt from an individual. This covers a debt payable from a tenant to a landlord, whether in respect of rent or other sums due under the lease.

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Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards were shown to be lacking in 2014 – proposed reforms can’t come soon enough

Author headshot imagePosted by , Chartered Legal Executive

Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards were proven to fail vulnerable people in 2014 – but nothing has changed. Planned reforms need to be made soon, argues Laura Jackson.

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The Parental Bereavement Bill – here’s why it’s important

Author headshot imagePosted by , Senior Associate

Currently there is no legal requirement for employers in the UK to provide paid leave for grieving parents, but a new bill – currently in parliament – could change that. Here’s what you need to know, and why it’s important.

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Current intention or a binding promise?

Author headshot imagePosted by , Senior Associate

Two recent disputes involving farming estates in the South West have looked at the issue of promises of inheritance made to children and what happens if those alleged promises appear to have been broken. Here we consider the relevant law further and look at what can be learnt from these cases.

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Self-driving Uber fatality – technological progress meets the same old excuses

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Cycling accident

As the news broke of a 49-year-old lady being struck and killed by an Uber driverless car in Arizona, it dawned on the world that this is the first fatality involving a pedestrian and a driverless car. But whilst this moment is a tragic landmark in both technology and the law, the reaction to Ms Herzberg’s death is sadly familiar.

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Litigants in person – will changes to the law make it harder to access justice?

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In January, Justice Minister Lord Keen shared his opinion about litigants in person. He insisted that litigants in person would be capable of handling their own personal injury claim, especially if that claim is not of substantial value. This is a significant setback for claimants who seek to access the justice they deserve, and here’s why.

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The PACE trial – “one of the biggest medical scandals of the 21st century”

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On 20 February 2018 a Parliamentary debate on the PACE trial – a controversial study on ME/CFS treatment – highlighted the flaws of the original trial whilst also raising debate over whether more information is needed to educate the public and the medical professions about the devastating effects of ME/CFS.

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New hope for mesothelioma and asbestos disease victims following Court of Appeal ruling

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On Thursday 22 February 2018, the Court of Appeal handed down its judgment in the case of Bussey v Anglia Heating. The outcome is a welcome one which will hopefully make it easier for many asbestos disease sufferers to recover compensation – including funding for immunotherapy treatment – which is not currently available on the NHS.

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Oxfam scandal – a lesson to be learned?

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The UK’s charity sector is under close scrutiny, both nationally and internationally, following allegations that Oxfam workers were involved in the hiring of prostitutes and engaged in sex parties whilst working on earthquake relief projects in Haiti and a humanitarian mission in Chad. But what can the sector learn from these events going forward?

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