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Domestic abuse and brain injury – a hidden issue?

Posted by , Solicitor
Contributing authors: Clizia Motterle

Brain injury, the effects of which are often hidden, has recently been found to be a big issue for women who have experienced domestic violence. What are the effects this may have and what can those who have experienced it do about it?

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Hugs are important, even as an element of therapy

Posted by , Associate

Just a day after blue Monday, we all need a reason to be cheerful which is why I’m smiling at National Hug Day.

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Will changing NHS targets enable the NHS to target change?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

With the worst figures on record during the month of December 2019, Matt Hancock has suggested that NHS A&E waiting time targets could soon be scrapped. Could this mean more ‘realistic’ reporting of the NHS’s current situation, and what could replace this target?

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Law Commission Valuation Report Proposals – will anything change?

Posted by , Senior Associate

Landlord rent house keys

The Law Commission has published its eagerly awaited proposals on their options for reforming the law on valuation in the acquisition of the freehold of leasehold properties and lease extensions.

The Law Commission was tasked with exploring options to reduce the cost of lease extensions and freehold purchases. This not only has legal implications but also political implications as by making the process cheaper for leaseholders, freeholders could lose out.

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Is hydrotherapy for children with cerebral palsy really necessary? What the latest research and case law says

Posted by , Partner

“Just because I like steak and chips, it doesn’t mean it’s good for me nor that someone else should pay for me to have it”. Surely this shouldn’t apply to hydrotherapy for children with cerebral palsy? According to some, it does. However Paul Rumley thinks the research, and case law, says otherwise.

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Is there a link between Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and homelessness?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

Josh Craig, a trainee in our Personal Injury team, takes a look at recent research which suggests there may be a causal link between brain injury and homelessness – two issues of great importance to our entire firm.

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Just how badly is the NHS struggling?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

Underperforming and understaffed: just how badly is the NHS struggling in 2019? Alex Kuklenko, currently working as a trainee in our Medical Negligence team, reviews the present state of our National Health Service.

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A ‘super’ Christmas campaign – how one charity is raising money for disabled children over the festive period

Posted by , Partner

Kerstin Scheel from our Medical Negligence team looks at how Brainwave is helping to raise money for disabled children over the Christmas period.

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I experienced a cardiac event – here’s what it was like

Posted by , Legal Claims Manager

Joachim Stanley, an experienced member of our Medical Negligence team, talks about his experience following a cardiac event this year.

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Thousands of drink drivers are reoffending – what does this mean for claimants?

Posted by , Associate

Road traffic collision

As the festive season approaches, awareness of the risks of drink driving come to the forefront of our minds, not least due to an increase in adverts highlighting how, if we drink and drive, we may end up arrested, injured or possibly even dead. Fortunately, the majority of us do think twice about how we intend to travel home after meeting friends or loved ones for a drink or two.

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Parental alienation: how is it treated in court and what can be done to spot it?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

Parental alienation is undoubtedly a hot topic. At the recent Oxford Local Family Justice Board conference, a large portion of the day was dedicated to the psychological perspective on this controversial issue, as well as recent case law relating to how it is treated by the judiciary.

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How is technology changing how post mortems are performed?

Posted by , Senior Associate

As part of her work considering all aspects of inquest law, Ali Cloak, considers the increasing use of post-mortem imaging to determine a cause of death as an alternative to an invasive surgical autopsy.

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