Search articles

Will changing NHS targets enable the NHS to target change?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

With the worst figures on record during the month of December 2019, Matt Hancock has suggested that NHS A&E waiting time targets could soon be scrapped. Could this mean more ‘realistic’ reporting of the NHS’s current situation, and what could replace this target?

Read more

The PSC regime – a misstep in company regulation?

Posted by , Solicitor

Since 1 April 2016 companies have been required to hold and maintain a register of people with significant control (PSC Register). Failure to provide accurate information on the PSC Register and failure to comply with notices requiring someone to provide information are criminal offences, and may result in a fine and or a prison sentence of up to two years.

Read more

Law Commission Valuation Report Proposals – will anything change?

Posted by , Senior Associate

Landlord rent house keys

The Law Commission has published its eagerly awaited proposals on their options for reforming the law on valuation in the acquisition of the freehold of leasehold properties and lease extensions.

The Law Commission was tasked with exploring options to reduce the cost of lease extensions and freehold purchases. This not only has legal implications but also political implications as by making the process cheaper for leaseholders, freeholders could lose out.

Read more

The end of the annual return, PSC Register – what is it and what changes were made?

Posted by , Partner

egister of People with Significant Control Regulations 2016

Since 6 April 2016, all UK companies (other than those subject to financial services requirements and certain listed companies) and LLPs have been required to keep a ‘Persons with Significant Control’ register (“Register”).

Read more

Is hydrotherapy for children with cerebral palsy really necessary? What the latest research and case law says

Posted by , Partner

“Just because I like steak and chips, it doesn’t mean it’s good for me nor that someone else should pay for me to have it”. Surely this shouldn’t apply to hydrotherapy for children with cerebral palsy? According to some, it does. However Paul Rumley thinks the research, and case law, says otherwise.

Read more

What will 2020 hold for care providers?

Posted by , Partner
Contributing authors: James Sage and Hazel Phillips

care home size

2019 has been a tumultuous year for social care providers, culminating in a heated general election campaign. Care providers will be looking to government for clarity and security in 2020, says the dedicated Social Care team at law firm Royds Withy King.

Read more

Is there a link between Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and homelessness?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

Josh Craig, a trainee in our Personal Injury team, takes a look at recent research which suggests there may be a causal link between brain injury and homelessness – two issues of great importance to our entire firm.

Read more

Life Sciences Forum – a few reflexions

Posted by , Partner

On Thursday 14 November I attended a great event at the offices of Deutsche Bank hosted and organised by the Swedish Chamber of Commerce in London.

Read more

Just how badly is the NHS struggling?

Posted by , Trainee Solicitor

Underperforming and understaffed: just how badly is the NHS struggling in 2019? Alex Kuklenko, currently working as a trainee in our Medical Negligence team, reviews the present state of our National Health Service.

Read more

A ‘super’ Christmas campaign – how one charity is raising money for disabled children over the festive period

Posted by , Partner

Kerstin Scheel from our Medical Negligence team looks at how Brainwave is helping to raise money for disabled children over the Christmas period.

Read more

I experienced a cardiac event – here’s what it was like

Posted by , Legal Claims Manager

Joachim Stanley, an experienced member of our Medical Negligence team, talks about his experience following a cardiac event this year.

Read more

Creative genius by artificial intelligence – but who owns the copyright?

Posted by , Associate

Artificial intelligence, once the stuff of science fiction, is now common place in our day to day lives. This is only set to increase rapidly over the coming years, but not without a unique set of legal challenges.

Read more

Search articles